GDSBEAT software has been free to download and use for the past four years. The aim of GDSBEAT was to automate and share some common interpretation methods with the geotechnical community, with the hope of aiding progression towards accepted standards and methodologies for these tests.
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The licence expires each year, as feedback and updates on the software are taken into consideration. For more information and to download a copy of the software click here.

GEOTEKO were required to carry out a series of triaxial tests for one of its clients to assess the samples susceptibility to liquefaction. The void ratio is one of the most important factors that affect the liquefacion phenomenon, therefore the exact determination of this parameter is very important for such tests. It is necessary to monitor the samples void ratio changes at each stage of the test.
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Watch a demonstration of the GDS' Resonant Column Apparatus software. The video completes a three part compilation of the Resonant Column, including a system overview and details of the apparatuses torsional excitation mechanism.
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GDS Instruments exhibited at the 19th ICSMGE conference in Seoul last month. The conference attracted 1,952 participants from 82 countries.
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GDS was supported on their stand by numerous agents from within the region. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the organisers for a great event and to everyone who visited our stand. For more information about the conference click here.

GDS have supplied equipment to over 75% of the world’s top 50 Universities who specialise in Civil & Structural Engineering, according to the “QS World University Ranking 2017” report. Having worked with so many of the leading universities around the world, GDS has become synonymous with highly accurate advanced testing apparatus.
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Peteris Skels and Kaspars Bondars from Riga Technical University set out to examine slope stability and landslide triggering mechanisms in colluvial soil in deep river valley slopes. Most of the landslides in Latvia evolve in deep river valleys after heavy consecutive rainfall in Autumn or rapid snowmelt in Spring (Latvian Geological Survey, 2003).
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